Personal Medicine: Becoming Active Agents in Our Own Recovery

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Date/Time
Date(s) - November 28
7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Location
St. Joseph Mercy Hospital Education Center

Categories


Personal Medicine: Becoming Active Agents in Our Own Recovery will be presented on Tuesday November 28, 2017, from 7:30 pm to 9:00 pm; by Jerry Fouchey, BS, MA, SpA, CADC; Dawn Farm Outpatient and Personal Medicine therapist.  Personal Medicine is any activity a person adopts because it helps them feel better and increases their sense of “Wellness.”  When we talk about Personal Medicine, we are not talking about a prescription ordered by a doctor, nor are we talking about over-the-counter medications, vitamins, herbal remedies or street drugs.  Personal Medicine is all about “Skills not Pills;” or things we do, not things we take.  In other words, Personal Medicine is the behaviors and habits we develop that help us enjoy life and address concerns we have for various areas of our lives. Conditions such as sleep disturbance, psychiatric symptoms including anxiety and depression, and chronic pain can challenge the substance use disorder recovery process.  For many people, these symptoms are the understandable, situational responses to the difficult circumstances in which they find themselves when they enter treatment. For others, these symptoms may simply be the protracted effects of long-term substance abuse.  And some people in early recovery will already have, or eventually receive, a verifiable mental health diagnosis.  Experience suggests that most of these concerns can best be effectively managed, at least in part, through behavioral interventions. The tendency towards over-reliance on standard medical practice for co-occurring conditions often relegates the person in recovery to the role of a passive recipient of a doctor’s care; usually a prescribed medication. Medications are often marginally effective, can generate unwanted side effects and don’t necessarily lead to better quality of life.  Further, new prescriptions provided in early recovery can be given credit for improvements that are more accurately attributed to the processes of treatment and recovery.  Personal Medicine is designed to address these concerns. This program is part of the Dawn Farm Education Series, a FREE, annual education series developed to provide accurate, helpful, hopeful, practical, current information about substance use disorders, recovery, family and related issues; and to dispel the myths, misinformation, secrecy, shame and stigma that prevent people with addiction and their families from getting help and getting well.  All programs are free and open to anyone interested.  Registration is not required. 1.5 hours of free C.E. approved by MCBAP (Michigan Certification Board for Addiction Professionals) is provided. A certificate to document attendance is provided on request. The Education Series is organized by Dawn Farm, a non-profit community of programs providing a continuum of services for people with substance use disorders. For information, please contact Emily Hagen, LLMSW; Dawn Farm Education Series Coordinator, at 734-485-8725 or [email protected], or see http://www.dawnfarm.org/programs/education-series.